Sticky

Disc jockeys of today are no longer the traditional broadcast personalities who played music selections over the air, most often unseen, seated and confined to radio booths. DJs or Deejays can now be seen performing anywhere, and for live audiences at dance clubs, night clubs, festivals, events, parties and online radios.

In order to give life to wherever djing takes them, deejays must strive to be the live wire that electrifies a venue with energy, using their creative mixes, remixes and tracks. Everything that a dj does, he does it not just to please the crowd, but also for his own pleasure of hearing tracks of music smoothly transitioning from one selection to another. While standing behind their turntables, deejays get all wrapped up, mixing and looping one song to another,whilst looking all so cool and relaxed.

Yet despite their seemingly enviable jobs and enjoyment with what they are doing, deejays are not exempt from suffering occupational hazards. They spend long hours listening to sample sound selections, trying to bring out something new, or adding greater depth to musical arrangements. Once they take on actual deejaying work, they will stand for about four to five hours, and possibly even longer. Rarely, if ever, will any one sees a deejay seated during a set, especially when and where there are guests dancing.

Due to the complexity and strenuous nature of their work, deejays are prone to suffer from neck pain and back pain. Such conditions can be aggravated when their concentration gets messed up by turntable woes; like when the table set up itself is too low for comfort. DJ tools, like any other mechanical device, have tendencies to go faulty in ways that make a deejaying engagement stressful. Technical difficulties happen and so do back pains, which could lead to contemplations of packing one’s DJ kit for good and looking for another line of work.

Actually, those who really want their back pain to go away permanently, take a break from deejaying and undergo a medical examination. After all, back and neck pains are symptoms common to musculoskeletal disorders, especially if one’s daily routine are regarded as risk factors.

What are Musculoskeletal Disorders?

Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) are feelings of pain or damages occurring in the parts supporting the human body; such as the muscles, ligaments, tendons, blood vessels, discs, and the likes, which are collectively called the musculoskeletal system. The trauma or pain becomes pronounced with every bodily movement, often affecting a person’s ability to perform a task. In serious to worst cases of musculoskeletal disorders, particularly those affecting the spine, a sufferer may even have difficulty walking or standing upright without a mobility aid.

Examples of MSDs include Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Degenerative Disc Disease, Herniated Discs, Tendonitis, Tension Neck Syndrome, DMechanical Back Syndrome, Digital Neuritis, Epicondylitis and many more. Some MSDs can get better with rest and conventional medical treatments, while those that tend to linger and cause unbearable pain specifically Degenerative Disc Diseases and Herniated Discs may require surgery.

Readers can find additional information about these diseases at the Central Texas Spine Institute in Austin website.